Category Archives: Parental roles

Avoid pet names

Avoid pet names

Strike a deal: If you don’t embarrass your children by calling them by their per names in public or when their friends visit, they will allow you to use – and enjoy – the names in private!

Introduce your children to people they have not met before, just as you would with an adult.

Point out role models. Tell your children about the people alive or dead whom you respect most. Explain to your kids what their values and achievements mean and how they have affected the lives of others.

Offer some guidance. Morality is not inborn: children have to learn it, which can be painful proces. From early on give them some help by explaining, as simply as possible, the basics: don’t try to upset or hurt people on purpose, and tell a frown-up immediately if someone is upsetting or hurting you.

Foster a sense of community, and the reciprocation that this entails, If a friend or neighbour has been particularly kind to your child, encourage them to repay the kindness by doing an errand for them, making them a card or giving them a little gift.
We sell give vouchers for family portrait session here in Sydney, so that might be an idea, too?

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Parental roles

Parental roles

Swap jobs. Surprise your kids by sometimes doing what they expect your partner to do, so they might find one day that Daddy is doing the school run and Mummy is asking them for help to build shelves. Taking on s task that your partner usually does can make for more equitable co-parenting.

Have one to one time. However many kids you have, try to give each one a little time alone with you. No two family relationships are the same, so children revel in getting Mummy, Daddy or another much-loved relative all to themselves. When the family is tired and fraught, it can be helpful to split up into more manageable teams.

Have one parenting approach. If Mum is very strict and Dad very lenient, or vice versa, kids get confused and behaviour tends to suffer. Bash out your differences in private so as to be able to give your your kids clear, coherent guidance.

Free your partner from parenting. Let them go on a short break with friends, take a course or just have a long lie-in ocasionally. Doing things all together as a family is great, but parents need their own time for work and play.

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